Social Media Management: Local vs. National

Posted by Paladin on May 18, 2017

Successful businesses spread. Sometimes that means a company selling and shipping products to other markets, but sometimes that means having offices in other markets. Then the question of social media management is raised. Do you create local social media accounts for each market or stick with just national accounts? The right answer may be different for each company. Here are some pros and cons to both approaches.

Pros:

  • You can reference local activities and local staff members! What better way to engage a community than to be part of it?
  • Announce special sales/deals/incentives. Many stores and businesses already to localized sales based on stock, events, etc. Without local social media channels, you would have a harder time disseminating that information. It can get buried in the corporate channels feeds without reaching the target audience.
  • You can handle customer service issues locally. Did someone buy damaged merchandise? The manager can reply to let them know that they can come in and make an exchange. On the flip side, if a customer has a great experience with an employee, they may be more likely to tag a local page.
  • Local social media management can amplify any corporate message. Your local affiliates can retweet and share information for you. Local customers may feel closer to a local account, so they may pay more attention to them. That sort of increased engagement encourages Facebook to share posts with more of your existing fans.

Cons:

  • You will need someone local to man these accounts. You may be able to assign it to a corporate staff member, but then they will have to spend time educating themselves to what is going on locally, and that comes with a cost. At the local level, you may not have people at the who are trained or willing to properly run social media accounts.
  • Controlling the message is harder. The more people you have involved in delivering a message, the more it can change.
  • Consistency can be a challenge. Local social media management is often assigned as an additional task to someone who already has a full plate. Or worse, it is given to a group of people so that no single person is accountable for posting. In this case, the accounts are ignored or posted sparsely to. Dead accounts reflect poorly on your brand, and may even make customers think that their local location has closed.
  • Diluting your brand. If you have too many local accounts drawing followers from your main account, it can hurt your brand’s strength.

Creating local social media accounts can be great for creating a relationship between a company and a community. However, for larger companies, strength of brand is likely more important. Weigh the pros and cons to create the right social media management strategy for your company or client.

If you’re looking for a social media manager, we can help. Or, if you’re a social media manager looking for a new gig, submit your resume today!

Posted in: Employers, Job Seekers, Marketing

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